570 Candler

There’s not many 2-story houses in Candler Park that aren’t new construction (and at the moment there’s precious little of that thank goodness), so I was shocked when this tall yellow house I’d never noticed appeared between the winter trees just off the bike path. Turns out it was 570 Candler St., an 1898 Queen Anne and it was for sale!

570 Candler-11

Candler Park at first glance seems like a fairly architecturally homogenous neighborhood, identifiable by the quaint craftsman bungalows marching up and down the hills in perfect little rows. But the neighborhood didn’t acquire that Candler Park “look” until well after it was annexed into the City of Atlanta in 1903, before that, the late 19th century community of Edgewood was centered here.

Significant settlement in the Edgewood area didn’t begin until after the Civil War, but growth must have been slow as the town was not formally incorporated until 1898, just 5 years before its annexation into Atlanta at which point it experienced a housing boom and began to take on the architectural and layout features we know today. Before it became a typical-looking early 20th century subdivision, the Edgewood area probably looked a lot like other small Southern towns with Victorian era Queen Anne houses and cottages (some plain, some graced with frills and ornamentation) spaced graciously on large lots (pecan trees, cows, and even vineyards between). Pockets of blue collar housing, near the railroad or industry just south of the railroad, and pockets of African-American residences, smaller and closely spaced, were mixed in with the wealthier white residences. More on the biracial history of Candler Park can be found at the Early Edgewood-Candler Park BiRacial History Project here.

These development patterns are evident in Candler Park’s housing architecture today. Among the Craftsman bungalows of the teens and 20s (actually, those were infill), a few plainer and a few grander homes are mixed in. Just past the Old Stone Church for instance, are a row of narrow houses on narrow lots and while they’ve been built out significantly, their original identity as humble and cheap shotgun houses is evident. Along Whitefoord south of the railroad tracks, several Victorian houses sit on lots clearly wider than their neighbors and occasionally, deep backyards can be glimpsed behind them where I guarantee you’ll find a grid of pecan trees.

1911 Sanborn Map fo Daley St. (now Candler) where the Daley House and the yellow Queen Anne house built for their daughter still stand.

1911 Sanborn Map of Daley St. (now Candler) where the Daley House and the yellow Queen Anne house built for their daughter still stand.

On the north side of the area there was at least one farmhouse that dated to 1855, the Daley House, located at the north end of Daley Street, now Candler. Which brings us to 570 Candler, a house which the Daleys built across the street for their daughter when she married.

570 Candler Street is not grand or presumptuous, its builders were not fancy people and lived several miles from the grand mansions of Peachtree St. in Atlanta. The 2-story house is a typical simple Queen Anne style house with Folk Victorian details. Technology in the lumber trade, and the subsequent ubiquity of mills, made mass production of milled ornamentation easy and cheap. Railroads, meanwhile, carried these pieces and patterns across the nation. Simple it may be but 570 Candler Street is a perfect encapsulation of its time.

The interior is remarkably intact aside from an addition here for bathrooms and another addition (split level?) on the back dating to the 60s or 70s for additional bedrooms and sunrooms. The 4” pine floors are just like the ones in our house, the mantles are comfortingly ubiquitous in the neighborhood as well as the interior trim. It once sat at the corner of Albemarle and Daley (now Candler) but all the houses to its left and rear were bulldozed in the 1970s to make way for the Stone Mountain Freeway, also another story.
570 Candler-9  570 Candler-2

Candler Park is a neighborhood whose value is highly aesthetic. The aesthetics of the historic architecture drive the sense of place and community. However, nothing protects these character-defining amenities and not everyone recognizes what holds this sense of place together, so with every house for sale I fear for the neighborhood as a whole. Best of luck to this prime piece of real estate.

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